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Although duplication occurs in English with such words as "boo-boo" and "choo-choo," translating this slang as "fisty" is probably better than translating this as "fist fist." This Chinese online slang, used to express something amazing, is the culmination of different memes developing separately, but combining to form a "super-meme." "Let's go, xxx" is a phrase that originated with the trump card of the Yu-Gi-Oh: Official Card Game in which its most powerful character is summoned by saying its name along with "Let's go!" Chinese netizens eventually ditched Yu-Gi-Oh's "Prehistoric Dragon Star" in favor of another popular Chinese slang term, "mantis shrimp," a nonsense word used to express dissatisfaction.Even though Du dedicated some of his work expressively for Li, Li chose not to appreciate Du; instead, Li chose to dedicate poetry to Du's rival, Wang Lun.This cold-blooded snub proved to be too much for Chinese netizens, prompting them to criticize Li Bai for his lack of kindness towards Du, thereby inspiring the phrase "Doesn't this pain your gentle heart? “) This weird phrase, used to convey ambivalence, goes back a long way to the Stephen Chow film (1992).And, it's responsible for creating a number of Chinese slang terms.One such slang comes from a Zhuhu response in which Chinese Internet users were aghast to be informed that venerated Chinese classical poet Li Bai treated his contemporary Du Fu with disdain.

Here's the image it's most associated with (you get it now): Yes, indeedy, now I understands it.A diet of video games and old movies have influenced the most popular online trends, as seen by a list of the hottest Chinese Internet slang from the first half of this year expected to bewilder anyone not up-to-date on some very obscure references.As compiled by Headline News, the online slang terms originate from such varied sources as online video game banter, a Yu-Gi-Oh card game, and even a 25-year-old Stephen Chow movie – subtle signs that Chinese youth are a little behind the times when it comes to pop culture. Here's the list: This phrase is used to describe "cuteness" through violence and requires a short explanation of basic Mandarin.Though I don't see how `biu' can be fourth tone or any tone, for there is no `biu' in pinyin; which initially caused my confusion.I understand now that it is an an attempt to onometapoesize outside of the given phonetic strictures of 汉语, which I deem a good thing.In the film, Chow delivers this classic line to Hong Kong's ingenue-of-the-moment Maggie Cheung.

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